neomexicanismos

cazadordementes:

EL MÉXICO DE LOS MEXICANOS

  1. La Mitotiliztli: La máquina de guerra y resistencia cultural mexica.
  2. La Mitotiliztli: La máquina de guerra y resistencia cultural mexica. (2)
  3. La Mitotiliztli: La máquina de guerra y resistencia cultural mexica. (3)
  4. Accion del juego: el lugar: Teotihuacán, sus artesanías y su juego de pelota
  5. México devoto: Mercado de Sonora, un mar de dioses, de oraciones, remedios o conjuros para tus amigos y tus no tan amigos; “le leemos las cartas”, la invitación a saber tu futuro.
  6. Mural de Tequila: Fotografía a color con luz natural que muestra uno de los murales existentes en el municipio de Tequila, Jalisco.
  7. El Paso de la Muerte: El paso de la muerte es la suerte donde el charro Mexicano demuestra su habilidad y valor en el Lienzo Charro de Pachuca Hidalgo.
  8. Escaramuzas: La escaramuza charra, además de deporte es todo un arte.
  9. Lazando: El charro lanza su reata para lazar a una yegua bronca
  10. "Retrato Inocente" : en el templo y los peques distraídos.
neomexicanismos

cazadordementes:

EL MÉXICO DE LOS MEXICANOS

  1. Apropiación del folklore: Parte de la serie belleza y folklore reinterpretado.
  2.  El árbol más abundante: En la Selva Maya, la segunda más extensa del continente americano después de la Amazónica, el chicozapote es el árbol más abundante, y puede alcanzar hasta 45 metros de altura.
  3. Tlayacapan, México
  4. Compañero musical: Compañero musical esperando entrar a la ceremonia del cambio de autoridades en el caracol de Morelia.
  5. Un chiclero con su familia: Actualmente, más de dos mil chicleros de los estados de Campeche y Quintana Roo están agrupados en 56 cooperativas y conforman el Consorcio Chiclero.
  6. Fuerza y Muerte: por el amor al arte hecho por sus mismas manos.
  7. Ellas:Compañeras durante el cambio de mandos en el caracol Zapatista de
  8. Morelia: Escuela autónoma en territorio rebelde Zapatista.
  9. Halloween: Mariachi Real de Mexico en presentacion en Chelsea Market conmemorando Halloween
  10. De la serie: Ateku jin ani´i Ñuu Savi (Vida y muerte del pueblo de la lluvia):  Ñuu Savi (Pueblo de la lluvia) es una cultura milenaria, actualmente sus habitantes mantiene viva su cosmovisión y su idioma. Retrato la vida y la muerte de mi familia que vive en las montañas de la comunidad de Yukunino, Oaxaca.

neomexicanismos

cazadordementes:

EL MÉXICO DE LOS MEXICANOS

  1. Generaciones de Chiapanecas: La tradicional fiesta de enero en Chiapa de Corzo, representada por sus principales personajes, los parachicos y las chiapanecas.
  2. Curiosidad: Niño mexicano dentro su salón de clases mira curiosamente a la camara.
  3. Familia Maya: La familia se reune para despedir a los visitantes.
  4. Bésame Chipaneca: La tradicional fiesta de enero en Chiapa de Corzo, representada por sus principales personajes, los parachicos y las chiapanecas.
  5. Sincretismo, ritual de vida: Danzante azteca baila en la cima del cerro de la Reina en el 1er encuentro nacional de danzas tradicionales en Tonalá, Jalisco.
  6. La Familia Otomi: Capilla Familiar , el culto a las animas de sus antepasados.
  7. Entre dos visiones: Fotografía que refleja el surrealismo mexicano atrapado entre dos visiones.
  8. Que Ondas: Niño pescando en la barca.
  9. Hay que salir a luchar como hermanos: Dos hermanos salen todos los días a las calles a luchar por una mejor vida.
  10. De Acero: Tres personas observan a un grupo de mujeres durante una sesión de ejercicio, mientras esperan el transporte público. Aspiraciones condensadas en distintos deseos.

maghrabiyya

starry-eyed-wolfchild:

THE SERI INDIANS of Sonora Mexico 

Many cultural changes have taken place in the last few decades. Except for special events, women no longer paint their faces as they once did. Those who saw and recorded Seri face painting marked a dying trait.

Women painted delicate and tasteful designs on their faces. Usually, designs were carried in a straight horizontal line across the upper face and over the bridge of the nose. Elements represented flowers, leaves, and other pretty motifs and it was all done just to be attractive.

Married women used distinctive but heavier patterns that identified them as matrons.

Men also painted on occasion-to go to war, for spiritual protection, or just general attraction. Designs suggested by medicine men could be used by both sexes for spiritual protection.

nolandwithoutstones
aztec-princesss
thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential
When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.
But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.
Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.
The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.
Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.
From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”
“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.
While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.
When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.
“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.
A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.
“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”
Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.
“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.
As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.
The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.
Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.
Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses
Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.
Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.
Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential

When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.

But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.

Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.

The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.

Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.

From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”

“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.

While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.

When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.

“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.

A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.

“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”

Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.

“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.

As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.

The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.

Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.

Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses

Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.

Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.

Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook